Vietnamese Egg Rolls (Chả Giò)

By: takestwoeggsPosted: 01/08/2022 Updated: 19/01/2024
Prep 15 minutes
Cook 30 minutes
Total 45 minutes
Crispy, crunchy, and savory Vietnamese egg rolls or chả giò are the quintessential Vietnamese dish that is perfect as an appetizer, afternoon snack, or a main dish! These Vietnamese egg rolls are made with ground pork, shrimp, carrots, taro, mushrooms, and noodles for the ultimate treat.
Vietnamese Egg Rolls (Chả Giò)

Crispy, crunchy, and savory Vietnamese egg rolls or chả giò are the quintessential Vietnamese dish that is perfect as an appetizer, afternoon snack, or main dish! These Vietnamese egg rolls are made with ground pork, shrimp, carrots, taro, mushrooms, and noodles for the ultimate crispy treat.

Dipping an egg roll wrapped with lettuce and herbs into vietnamese dipping sauce.

If you have never had a Vietnamese egg roll or chả giò, you have to try one immediately. They are one of my favorite finger food appetizers. Their crispy shell encases mouthwatering savory pork and shrimp filling that makes my stomach grumble every time I spot one from a mile away.

Vietnamese egg rolls are probably the most commonly prepared appetizers at Vietnamese gatherings. They are traditionally served with fresh crisp lettuce and herbs and then dipped in a delicious Vietnamese dipping sauce (nuoc cham).

This recipe for Vietnamese egg rolls is my mom’s special recipe she makes for all of her church events. I had to translate her recipe since all she gave me was “mix together pork, shrimp, and the same amount of carrot, taro, noodles, dried mushrooms, onion. Then add salt, pepper adds chicken powder. Mix, roll, and fry.”

This crispy cha gio recipe may be a labor of love, but the satisfaction of eating them is well worth the effort. If you loved this Vietnamese egg roll recipe, check out my Vietnamese shrimp toast, pate chaud, and banh beo recipes!

A plate with a stack of vietnamese egg rolls.

Why You’ll Love This Recipe

  • These deep-fried and crispy egg rolls make the perfect appetizer, lunch, or afternoon snack.
  • Making this cha gio recipe is easier than you think and yields the most mouthwatering pork and shrimp egg rolls that pair beautifully with a Vietnamese dipping sauce (nuoc cham).
  • This Vietnamese egg roll recipe will guide you step-by-step with photos and a tips section on how to make the most delicious cha gio you could ever ask for. If you need another visual reference on how to roll an egg roll, check out our reel on Instagram!
Someone grabbing an egg roll from a plate piled with egg rolls.

Kitchen Equipment

You will need the following kitchen equipment to make this recipe for Vietnamese egg rolls.

  • Food processor: you will need a food processor or a mini food processor to grind up your shrimp into a paste to mix into your filling.
  • Grater: I used the fine side of a boxed grater to finely shred the carrots and taro.
  • Cheesecloth or dish towel: you must use a cheesecloth or dish towel to wring out all the excess juices from your vegetables to prevent your cha gio from getting soggy.
  • Large mixing bowl: you will need a large mixing bowl to mix together the filling ingredients.
  • Heavy Bottom Pot: I recommend using a heavy bottomed pot to safely fry your egg rolls.
  • Candy Thermometer: this will guide you on how hot the oil temperature is so that you can adjust your stove accordingly. I recommend using a candy thermometer if you are new to frying food.
  • Spider strainer: using a spider strainer or large slotted spoon will be the easiest way to remove each batch of Vietnamese egg rolls.
  • Wire rack: you will need a wire rack to cool the egg rolls on so they remain crunchy and not get soggy.

Ingredients

You can find all of the ingredients for this recipe for Vietnamese egg rolls online or at your local Asian grocery store.

  • Pork: the main protein base of the egg rolls.
  • Shrimp: must be peeled, deveined, and pulverized in a food processor. It adds a depth of flavor to the pork.
  • Eggs: the eggs bind all the ingredients together and hold the filling’s shape.
  • Carrot: adds sweetness, color, and flavor.
  • Taro: adds additional sweetness and softens the texture of the filling.
  • Yellow Onion: is the primary aromatic of the dish.
  • Bean Thread Noodles: or cellophane noodles are typically made from mung beans, potato starch, tapioca starch, or rice flour. Bean thread noodles are thin and clear and require you to soak them before mixing them into the other ingredients. You can buy these online or are typically in the noodle aisle of your local Chinese or Vietnamese grocery store.
  • Dried Wood Ear Mushrooms: adds texture and delicious umami mushroom flavor. I recommend using dried mushrooms instead of fresh ones to limit the amount of moisture that goes into the egg rolls.
  • Salt and Pepper: seasons the egg rolls.
  • Sugar: adds a touch of sweetness to this cha gio recipe.
  • Chicken bouillon powder: adds a touch of salty, umami flavoring to the egg rolls. You can buy chicken bouillon powder online or at your local Asian grocery store.
  • Egg roll wrappers: I recommend using Menlo Wrappers for more golden brown results.
  • Vegetable oil: a neutral oil with a high smoke point for frying I use
All the ingredients to make vietnamese egg rolls.

Substitutions and Additions

You can customize this Vietnamese egg roll recipe based on your personal preferences, I’ve listed some additional substitutions below.

  • Ground meat: this Vietnamese egg roll recipe uses ground pork and shrimp, but you can alter the meat by using ground beef, ground chicken, ground turkey, etc.
  • Jicama: instead of using taro, I have seen other Vietnamese egg roll recipes incorporate jicama instead for a lighter flavor. Remember to squeeze out the excess juices from the jicama the same way you squeeze the other ingredients.
  • Wood Ear Mushrooms: instead of dried mushrooms, you can also use fresh wood ear mushrooms. However, I recommend squeezing out the excess moisture before adding them.
  • Shallots: instead of a yellow onion, you can use 1-2 shallots instead for a stronger more aromatic flavor.
  • Rice paper: instead of egg roll wrappers, you can alternatively use rice paper wrappers. Rice paper wrappers are the traditional wrappers but they do not brown as well, do not stay crispy as long, and require an extra step of soaking before each use.
  • Oil: for this cha gio recipe, I used vegetable oil. But you can use any neutral oil with a high smoke point such as peanut oil or canola oil.

How to Make Cha Gio

This cha gio recipe is pretty straightforward and very satisfying to make. I recommend reading through the instructions and tips section before you begin!

Filling

  1. Soften the noodles. In a large bowl, soak the bean thread noodles in hot water until they are soft about 2-3 minutes. Then cut the noodles into 2-inch pieces. Pat dry to remove any excess water
Bean Thread noodles soaking in water to soften.
  1. Soak the mushrooms. In a large bowl, soak the dried mushrooms in hot water until they are soft about 10 minutes. Drain and pat dry to remove any excess water. Then roughly chop.
Shredded woodear mushrooms being soaked in water.
  1. Squeeze excess moisture. Using a cheesecloth, squeeze out all the excess moisture from the shredded carrot, shredded taro, and minced onion.
  2. Combine. In a large bowl, add the pork, shrimp, eggs, shredded carrots, shredded taro, minced onion, chopped mushrooms, chopped noodles, salt, black pepper, sugar, and chicken broth powder. Mix together with a wooden spoon or your hands until combined.
  1. Taste. Place a 1/2 teaspoon of the mixture on a small plate and microwave it for 5-10 seconds until cooked. Taste and see if you want to adjust any of the spices (add more salt, pepper, etc.).

Assembly

  1. Lay one egg roll wrapper and place it with one corner pointing towards you like a diamond. Fold the bottom corner about 2/3 of the way up.
Folding over a third of the wrapper.
  1. Add an even layer of filling across the bottom edge about 2 1/2-3 tablespoons leaving a 1/4 inch gap along the edge.
Placing the filling onto the wrapper.
  1. Fold the left and right corners over the filling. Then tightly roll up until the end. Seal the top corner with egg wash.

Cook

  1. Heat oil. In a heavy bottomed pot, add about 1-2 inches of oil just enough to submerge the egg rolls. Heat on medium-high until it reaches 350°F or 176°C.
  2. Fry. Using a slotted spoon or spider strainer, gently add about 5-6 egg rolls. Be careful to not overcrowd the pot. Fry for about 10-12 minutes or until golden brown.
  3. Cool. Place the egg rolls on a paper towel over a wire rack to cool for 10 minutes before serving.

Tips for the Best Vietnamese Egg Rolls

  • Squeeze the juice from the carrots, onion, and taro! You do not want your filling to have any more moisture than necessary. Any excess moisture from the filling will result in a less crunchy egg roll down the road. Do not skip the step where you squeeze juices out of the shredded carrots, onion, and taro!
  • Roll your egg rolls tightly. Any air bubbles or openings will cause the wrapper to fall apart and the filling to explode when deep frying.
  • Don’t use too much filling. You do not want your cha gio to burst open when you fry them. To prevent this, use just enough filling to cover about 3 1/2 inches across the egg roll wrapper. I used about 2 1/2-3 tablespoons per egg roll. Make sure to shape the filling to be even and uniform.
  • Use a candy thermometer when frying. If you are new to frying, it is important that you use a candy thermometer and a deep heavy bottomed pan. Since the oil temperature will fluctuate when you add the Vietnamese egg rolls in, a candy thermometer will let you know how hot the oil is.
  • Carefully watch the egg rolls when frying. This is especially important. It may be difficult to maintain an even temperature the entire time you fry the egg rolls. So keeping a close eye on when the egg rolls begin to turn golden brown will guarantee you won’t overcook the egg rolls. Please note that the cha gio will continue to cook while they cool so they will turn slightly darker after they have been sitting on the wire rack for a few minutes.

Storage Instructions

The best way to store these Vietnamese egg rolls is to freeze the uncooked egg rolls in a freezer-safe container in the freezer for up to 3 months. To reheat simply fry them frozen until golden brown.

Placing this cha gio recipe in the refrigerator will cause them to get soggy over time. To re-heat already fried egg rolls, I recommend baking them or using an air fryer to crisp them back up.

Frequently Asked Q’s & A’s

What is chả giò?

In Vietnamese, chả giò translates to egg rolls.

How do you eat Vietnamese egg rolls?

Vietnamese egg rolls are normally served with a side of pickled carrots and daikon (đồ chua), a Vietnamese dipping sauce (nuoc cham), and wrapped in lettuce and herbs!
Alternatively, you can use this Vietnamese egg roll recipe for a meal with vermicelli noodles in a dish called bun cha gio.

How do you make chả giò crispy?

There are multiple factors in achieving a crispy Vietnamese egg roll.

1) Use dried mushrooms! My mom says that using fresh mushrooms will work but they will bring excess moisture which will shorten the crispy lifeline of the egg roll.

2) Squeeze the excess juices from the carrots, onion, and taro. These three vegetables hold a lot of moisture when they are shredded. To eliminate any excess moisture from the inside of the egg roll, use a cheesecloth to squeeze out the juices.

3) Cool the egg rolls on a paper towel over a wire rack so that the paper towel can absorb the excess moisture while the wire rack allows the egg roll to cool without getting soggy.

Can you freeze Vietnamese egg rolls?

Yes! You can freeze the uncooked egg rolls in a freezer-safe container in the freezer for up to 3 months. To reheat simply fry them frozen until golden brown.

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Recipe

Up close of someone dipping a vietnamese egg roll into dipping sauce.

Vietnamese Egg Rolls (Chả Giò)

5 from 1 vote
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 45 minutes
Crispy, crunchy, and savory Vietnamese egg rolls or chả giò are the quintessential Vietnamese dish that is perfect as an appetizer, afternoon snack, or a main dish! These Vietnamese egg rolls are made with ground pork, shrimp, carrots, taro, mushrooms, and noodles for the ultimate treat.
Servings: 12 servings
Print Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 lb ground pork
  • ½ lb shrimp ground
  • 2 large eggs
  • ¾ cup carrot finely shredded
  • ¾ cup taro finely shredded
  • ½ yellow onion minced
  • ½ cup bean thread noodles
  • ½ cup dried wood ear mushrooms chopped
  • 1 ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon chicken broth powder
  • 1 package egg roll wrappers at least 25 wrappers
  • Vegetable oil for frying

Egg wash

  • 1 large egg beaten

Instructions

Filling

  • Soften the noodles. In a large bowl, soak the bean thread noodles in hot water until they are soft about 2-3 minutes. Then cut the noodles into 2-inch pieces. Pat dry to remove any excess water
  • Soak the mushrooms. In a large bowl, soak the dried mushrooms in hot water until they are soft about 10 minutes. Drain and pat dry to remove any excess water. Then roughly chop.
  • Squeeze excess moisture. Using a cheesecloth, squeeze out all the excess moisture from the shredded carrot, shredded taro, and minced onion.
  • Combine. In a large bowl, add the pork, shrimp, eggs, shredded carrots, shredded taro, minced onion, chopped mushrooms, chopped noodles, salt, black pepper, sugar, and chicken broth powder. Mix together with a wooden spoon or your hands until combined.
  • Taste. Place a 1/2 teaspoon of the mixture on a small plate and microwave it for 5-10 seconds until cooked. Taste and see if you want to adjust any of the spices (add more salt, pepper, etc.

Assembly

  • Lay one egg roll wrapper and place it with one corner pointing towards you like a diamond. Fold the bottom corner about 2/3 of the way up.
  • Add an even layer of filling across the bottom edge about 2 1/2-3 tablespoons leaving a 1/4 inch gap along the edge.
  • Fold the left and right corners over the filling. Then tightly roll up until the end. Seal the top corner with egg wash.

Cook

  • Heat oil. In a heavy bottomed pot, add about 1-2 inches of oil just enough to submerge the egg rolls. Heat on medium-high until it reaches 350°F or 176°C.
  • Fry. Using a slotted spoon or spider strainer, gently add about 5-6 egg rolls. Be careful to not overcrowd the pot. Fry for about 10-12 minutes or until golden brown.
  • Cool. Remove the egg rolls with a slotted spoon or spider strainer and place them on a paper towel over a wire rack to cool for 10 minutes before serving.

Notes

  • Squeeze the juice from the carrots, onion, and taro! You do not want your filling to have any more moisture than necessary. Any excess moisture from the filling will result in a less crunchy egg roll down the road. Do not skip the step where you squeeze juices out of the shredded carrots, onion, and taro!
  • Roll your egg rolls tightly. Any air bubbles or openings will cause the wrapper to fall apart and the filling to explode when deep frying.
  • Don’t use too much filling. You do not want your cha gio to burst open when you fry them. To prevent this, use just enough filling to cover about 3 1/2 inches across the egg roll wrapper. I used about 2 1/2-3 tablespoons per egg roll. Make sure to shape the filling to be even and uniform.
  • Use a candy thermometer when frying. If you are new to frying, it is important that you use a candy thermometer and a deep heavy bottomed pan. Since the oil temperature will fluctuate when you add the Vietnamese egg rolls in, a candy thermometer will let you know how hot the oil is.
  • Carefully watch the egg rolls when frying. This is especially important. It may be difficult to maintain an even temperature the entire time you fry the egg rolls. So keeping a close eye on when the egg rolls begin to turn golden brown will guarantee you won’t overcook the egg rolls. Please note that the cha gio will continue to cook while they cool so they will turn slightly darker after they have been sitting on the wire rack for a few minutes.

Nutrition:

Calories: 191kcal | Carbohydrates: 16g | Protein: 12g | Fat: 9g | Saturated Fat: 3g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 4g | Trans Fat: 0.003g | Cholesterol: 85mg | Sodium: 402mg | Potassium: 287mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 3029IU | Vitamin C: 2mg | Calcium: 34mg | Iron: 1mg

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